Civil War Veterans Buried In Washington State - David Paramore

David Lewis Paramore

Representing: Union
G.A.R. Post: Oliver Morton Post #10 Snohomish, WA


Unit History

  • 12th Indiana Infantry B
  • 134th Indiana Infantry A

See full unit history

David Paramore
Full Unit History

12th INDIANA VOLUNTER INFANTRY
Organized: 5/61 Indianapolis, IN
Mustered In: 5/11/61 Indianapolis, IN
Mustered Out: 5/16/62 at Washington, DC

 

134th INDIANA VOLUNTEER INFANTRY
Organized: 5/64 Indianapolis, IN
Mustered In: 5/25/64 Indianapolis, IN
Mustered Out: 9/2/64 at Indianapolis, IN

 

Regimental History

REGIMENTAL HISTORY: 12th  

   In June, 1861 this one-year regiment moved from Indianapolis to Evansville, IN to perform blockade duty.  It left the state for Maryland in July to join Union Gen. Banks’ Army of The Shenandoah.  By September the 12th was stationed at Williamstown skirmishing with the enemy while on picket and outpost duty.

   In March, 1862 it moved to Winchester, VA and, after skirmishing with the rebels, was the first regiment to enter the town after its evacuation.  The 12th engaged in various movements until April 3, then was in camp for a time at Warrenton, VA before mustering out.  Losses: 24 enlisted men died of disease or were accidentally killed.

 

REGIMENTAL HISTORY:134th  

   Indiana’s quota for “100 day” regiments was eight.  The 134th was one of these units which were primarily used for guard and garrison duty thus freeing up veteran troops for active fieldwork during the important campaigns of 1864.  Seven companies of the 134th were recruited in the 4th and three in the 5th Congressional District.

   The 134th left the state for Tennessee almost immediately following Federal muster.  Like its sister units, the regiment was assigned to guard duty along one or more railroads- the Nashville & Chattanooga, Tennessee & Alabama, and Memphis & Charleston- keeping Union Gen. W.T. Sherman’s communication and supply lines flowing.  Losses: 32 enlisted men died from disease or accidents.  

Soldier History

SOLDIER: 12th
Residence: Dupont, IN   Age: 21.6 yrs.
Enrolled: 10/3/1861   Rank: Pvt.
Discharged: 5/14/62 Washington D.C.
Highest Rank: Pvt.

 

SOLDIER: 134th
Residence: Adams, IN   Age: 24.1 yrs.
Enrolled: 5/6/64 Jefferson Co.   Rank: Pvt.
Discharged: 9/2/64 Indianapolis, IN
Highest Rank: Pvt.

Family History

PERSONAL/FAMILY HISTORY:

   David Lewis Paramore was born 3/18/40 in Greenburg, IN.  He had at least one sibling, a sister, Henrietta.  In 1841 the Paramores moved from Greenburg to Madison and, circa 1857, from Madison to near Dupont, IN.

   It was there in 1862 that 5’4” farmer “D. Lew” Paramore enlisted in the U.S. military for the first time.  That initial enrollment appears to have been uneventful, so he later signed on for a second time.  His second enlistment was in a company raised by a Captain Drake and was assigned to the 134th Indiana Infantry as Co. “A.”  This enrollment, too, was apparently without trauma.

   Leaving the army for the final time “D. Lew” returned to Indiana where he “learned the drug business.”  In 1865 he resettled in Mt. Pleasant, IA where he remained until 1873.  Mr. Paramore next spent ten months in Salt Lake City, UT before moving to San Francisco, CA.  He resided there until late 1879 then spent six months in Virginia City, NV before moving to Oakland, CA for an additional 2 ½ years.

   A return to Virginia City preceded his finding a permanent home in Snohomish, Washington circa 1889/90.  In Snohomish D. Lew was employed by pioneer druggist Lot Wilbur before opening a business for himself.  Within the community he belonged to all the Masonic orders.

   As commander of the Morton Post #10 G.A.R. and a trustee of the G.A.R. cemetery association he was instrumental in erection of the G.A.R. monument and, along with Washington Governor Lister, spoke at the 1914 dedication ceremony.

   In early 1921 D. Lew made a trip to England as the Washington state representative of the Masonic lodge.  During these travels his health began to fail and, on 8/7/21, a month after returning home, he died.  The 81.4 year old Civil War veteran had never married and fathered no children.  At death he was receiving $50 from the U.S. government based on his youthful soldiering.  

Cemetery

Buried at Snohomish G.A.R.
Row: 19
Site: 1

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Seattle, WA


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