Civil War Veterans Buried In Washington State - Jacob Billings

Jacob Billings

Representing: Union


Unit History

  • 1st Indiana Cavalry D

See full unit history

Jacob Billings
Full Unit History

1st INDIANA VOLUNTEER CAVALRY
Organized: 1861 Evansville, IN 
Mustered In: 8/20/61
Mustered Out: 5/31/65 Indianapolis, IN

Regimental History

REGIMENTAL HISTORY:

 

This three year western theater regiment was organized in 1861 as the 28th Indiana Volunteer Infantry. The designation was subsequently changed to the 1st Indiana Volunteer Cavalry before the unit took to the field. The first eight companies were mustered in to Federal service on August 20th and left the state the following day headed for St. Louis, MO. 

Once in Missouri they were ordered to Ironton and were there engaged in a sharp skirmish with the enemy at Black River. This part of the regiment was then stationed a Pilot Knob during the fall of 1861 and the winter of 1861/'62. During this period it saw action at Fredericktown.  

In February, 1862 this portion of the 1st moved into Arkansas. There, in July, it was engaged with Rebel forces at Round Hill. With the exception of company "C" this part of the regiment remained on duty in Arkansas during the remainder of its term of service. The last year of its tenure was spent at Pine Bluff. It was mustered out at Indianapolis on 9/6/64. 

Company "C" which had been detached for escort duty marched with Union General U.S. Grant's army to Vicksburg, MS. It then moved into Louisiana before rejoining the regiment in July, 1864.

 

Recruits remaining in Arkansas were organized into two companies and stationed at Pine Bluff. There, they participated in a severe engagement in September, 1864. Later, they were stationed at White River and St. Charles before being mustered out at Indianapolis in June, 1865.

Soldier History

SOLDIER:
Residence: Posey Co., IN   Age:
Enlisted/Enrolled: 8/20/61   Rank: Blacksmith (Pvt.)
Mustered In: 8/20/61
Disability Discharge: 1/10/63
Highest Rank: Blacksmith (Pvt.)

Family History

PERSONAL/FAMILY HISTORY:

 

NOTE:  The birth - to - death biographical profile below was created "by request". It was created without the assistance of documents housed in the National Archives located in Washington, D.C. As such, it suffers from the depth and details of bios written with such documentation at hand. 

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Born 18 June 1830 in Franklin, Vermont

Died 7 March 1921 (age 89-90)

Buried at Washington Soldiers Home Cemetery

Orting, Pierce County, Washington

Find a Grave Memorial #5550568

Note: The Find a Grave Memorial is in error on the year of Jacob Billings’ birth which was

actually 1830 (and not 1831).

“Jacob lived in Posey County when he enlisted on 08.20.1861 as a Blacksmith.

On 08.20.1861 he mustered into “D” Co. IN 1st Cavalry.

He was discharged for disability on 01.10.1863.”

 

 

Timeline of Jacob Billings’ Life

compiled and prepared by Andy and Ann Marie Liakos who live in Murphy, North Carolina

Jacob Billings was Andy’s Great x3 Grandfather

 

18 June 1830 Jacob was born in Franklin, Vermont. Verification of Jacob’s birth date

comes from Civil War enlistment records. Jacob’s parents were both born

in Ireland. His parents were probably Jacob Billings and Mary (Elkins)

Billings, although there is at least one suggestion that Jacob’s parents

were Joseph Billings and Mary (Auldrich or Aldrich) Billings.

11 November 1851 Jacob Billings married Julia Ann Green in Indiana. Abraham Moore

officiated. She was born on 1 May, 1834 in Ripley, Brown County, Ohio.

Source 1) Pioneers and Early Settlers, Sanders County Montana,

Camas Area. Book One of Nine. Volume 1 of 2. By Ann Miller. Source

2) Indiana Marriages 1811-2008, County Clerk’s Office.

June 1853 Jacob’s son, William Thomas Billings, was born in June in Indiana.

02 September 1855 Jacob’s son, Joseph A. Billings, was born on 2 September, in Indiana. He

married Mary Jane (Inman) Billings. Joseph would go on to run for

Railroad Commissioner in Montana. Joseph A. Billings died on 06 July,

1931 in Montana.

1860 Census shows residence in Troy Troy Township, Perry, Indiana.

18 August 1860 Jacob’s daughter, Mary Charlotte “Lottie” Billings was born on 18 August

in Cannelton, Perry, Indiana. She married James B. Inman in 1879, in

Kansas. Her husband James was born on August 14, 1856, in Janesville,

Rock County, Wisconsin. Mary Charlotte “Lottie” passed away on 08

July, 1954 in Centralia, Lewis County, Washington. “Lottie” is buried at

the Napavine Cemetery in Napavine, Lewis county, Washington. Find a

Grave Memorial #1240333.

20 August 1861 Jacob enlisted in Union service during the Civil War. Reference: “D”

Company IN 1st Calvary. He was a Blacksmith and Farrier (later worked

as a shoemaker in civilian life). At the time of his enlistment, Jacob lived

in Posey County. He is said to have enrolled in Evansville, Indiana (28th

Regiment). He was discharged for disability on 10 January, 1863.

Indiana Digital Archives Accession Number 1938001.

https://secure.in.gov/apps/iara/search/Home/Detail?rId=1115109

April 1862 Jacob Billings served in the capacity of “orderly” for Colonel Baker. He

was a Private with Company D, 1st Regiment, Indiana Cavalry. Records

of Civil War Service from the National Archives.

September 1862 Jacob Billings is shown as a “Saddler” with Company D, 1st Regiment,

Indiana Cavalry. He was present at the Company Muster Roll. The record

remarks read: “Furnished his own horse & horses equipment for the

period for which he draws pay.” Records of Civil War Service from the

National Archives. Similar records exist across 1861 and 1862.

December 1862 Jacob Billings was absent from duties due to hospitalization from

December 1862 to March 1863. Records of Civil War Service from the

National Archives.

10 March 1863 The Army of the United States issued a Certificate of Disability for

Discharge for Jacob Billings of Captain Talbot’s Company due to chronic

gastritis. At the time of discharge, he had been off duty for seven months,

two of those having been confined to a hospital. He was said to be 5’ 8 ½”

tall, and to have had gray eyes. His occupation was listed as “shoemaker.”

Army of the United States Certificate of Disability for Discharge. 1863.

1864 Jacob’s son Henry E. Billings was born. He may have been called

“Hank”. Henry died on 16 November 1927. Note: It is also possible

that Jacob had a brother named or nicknamed “Hank”.

@ 1867 Jacob’s daughter Alice Catherine Billings was born. The exact date

is not known. Alice Catherine Billings passed away in November

of 1914, in Tacoma, Pierce County, Washington. Her married name

was Costello, and she lived in Salido, Colorado as of 1912.

1870 Census shows residence in Union, Perry, Indiana.

09 April 1879 “Homestead Notice. U.S. Land Office, Grand Island, Neb., April 2, 1879.

Complaint having been entered at this office by John Dahams against

Jacob Billings for abandoning his Homestead Entry no. 7424, dated

March 19, 1878, upon the east ½ of the southeast ¼ Section 32, Township

19 north, Range 3 west in Platte county, Nebraska, with a view to the

cancellation of said entry: the said parties are hereby summoned to

appear at this office on the 8th day of May, 1879 at 10 o’clock a.m. to

respond and furnish testimony concerning said alleged abandonment.

Depositions to be used in said contest will be taken at the office of

Samuel C. Smith, in Columbus, Nebraska, May 5th, 1879 at 10 a.m.

M.B. Hoxie, Register. Wm. Anyan, Receiver. The Columbus Journal.

April 9th, 1879. Note: This notice was reposted in the April 30, 1879

edition of The Columbus Journal.

1880 Republican County Convention references Jacob Billings in notes about

the Fifth Ward – “Fifth Ward – Thos. Cummins for James Shields; John

McDonnell for Jacob Billings; Ed Leader for Geo. Redman.” Omaha

Daily Bee. August 30, 1880, Morning Edition.

1880 Census shows residence in Medicine Lodge, Barber, Kansas.

14 February 1884 Jacob Billings was a candidate in the election of justices. Returns showed

65 votes for S.G. Pillsbury, 27 votes for Jacob Billings, and 46 votes for

I.W. Nettleship. Phillipsburg Herald. Phillipsburg, Kansas. February

14, 1884.

1885 Jacob Billings was living in Long Island, Kansas. He was a farmer.

1885 The Kansas Census shows Jacob’s son, Joseph Billings and his wife

Mary, living in the area with their sons, Roy, Lewis, and Willie. Joseph’s

occupation is shown as “shoemaker” which was also the trade of his

father, Jacob Billings. Roberta Gebhardt, Library Manager, Montana

Historical Society Research Center. 225 North Roberts. Helena, MT

59620. Note: “Roy” referenced above is actually “Ray Orr Billings”.

24 October 1885 “Jacob Billings, of Long Island, has opened up a boot and shoe repair

shop in Phillipsburg. Mr. Billings will have all the work he can do.”

Phillipsburg Herald. Phillipsburg, Kansas. October 24, 1885.

21 November 1885 “We believe in protective tariff, to protect our home mechanics. Now

patronize our boot and shoe establishment conducted by Jacob Billings.

Room six, up stairs in Bissell’s block.” Phillipsburg Herald. Phillisburg,

Kansas. November 21, 1885.

20 November 1886 “David Close and Link Nipps have bought out the east side meat market

and will move into their new shop as soon as completed. Mitchell &

Hatfield will soon take up quarters in the old Durks building and the

south room will be occupied by Jacob Billings for a shoe shop. These east

side fellows are rustlers but we usually manage to keep run of the shifts.”

Phillipsburg Herald. Phillipsburg, Kansas. November 20, 1886.

1889 Jacob was a member of the Grand Army of the Republic’s Conrad Baker

Post in Voltaire, Sherman, Kansas. See also a reference to the Phillipsburg

Post No. 77.

25 October 1893 “Olate, Ks. October 21st. – The A.W. Little habeas corpus proceedings

were resumed before Judge Burris this morning. Jacob Billing testified

that he was acquainted with A.W. Little while he lived at McPherson,

Kansas, and that he had trouble with him.” Barbour County Index.

Medicine Lodge, Kansas. October 25, 1893.

1897 Jacob Billings was a Justice of the Peace in Kalispell, Montana. Annual

Report of the Bureau of Agriculture, Labor and Industry of Montana

for the year ended November 30, 1897.

1897 Jacob Billings is listed in the proceedings as a delegate of the Department

of Montana Grand Army of the Republic. Roberta Gebhardt, Library

Manager, Montana Historical Society Research Center. 225 North

Roberts. Helena, MT 59620.

07 December 1888 “We also met here our old soldier friend, Jacob Billings. He has just

opened a boot and shoe repair shop and we found him quite busy. Long

Island has many other good citizens we should like to mention personally,

but space forbids.” Phillipsburg Herald. Phillipsburg, Kansas.

December 7, 1888.

1898 Jacob Billings was a Justice of the Peace in Kalispell, Montana. Annual

Report of the Bureau of Agriculture, Labor and Industry of Montana

for the year ended November 30, 1898.

1899 Jacob Billings is listed in the proceedings as a delegate of the Department

of Montana Grand Army of the Republic. Roberta Gebhardt, Library

Manager, Montana Historical Society Research Center. 225 North

Roberts. Helena, MT 59620.

09 April 1899 “At a meeting of George G. Mead post No. 16, G.A.R., held last evening,

the post was visited by Comrades N.H. Morley of the Soldier’s home at

Columbia Falls, and Jacob Billings of Kalispell. Both of these old

veterans were called upon for a few remarks, and they responded in a

manner that touched the hearts of the “old boys” of Anaconda. The affair

was an exceedingly pleasant and social one.” Anaconda Standard.

April 9, 1899. Page 5.

1900 Census shows that Jacob was a shoemaker whose residence was in

Kalispell Township, Kalispell City, Flathead County, Montana.

1900 Jacob Billings was a Justice of the Peace in Kalispell, Montana. Annual

Report of the Bureau of Agriculture, Labor and Industry of Montana

for the year ended November 30, 1900.

07 September 1900 Jacob Billings is shown as having received $35.50 in justice fees.

The Kalispell Bee. September 7, 1900. Page 4.

20 December 1900 Jacob Billings is shown as having received $800 in payment for an

addition to a store building in Kalispell, Montana. The Kalispell Bee.

December 20, 1900. Christmas Edition. Page. 11.

1901 Jacob Billings is listed as a Commander of the Nat Lyons Post No. 23,

Grand Army of the Republic. Polk City Directories. Flathead and

Lincoln County. Montana Memory Project. Mtmemory.org

05 February 1901 “The resignation of Jacob Billings as justice of the peace for Kalispell

township, was accepted, and A. McArthur appointed to fill the vacancy.”

Kalispell Bee. February 5, 1901. Page 3.

27 November 1901 “Attention, Comrades! All old soldiers in Kalispell and vicinity are

invited to meet with the members of Nat Lyons Post No. 23 on Saturday

evening, November 20, at 7 o’clock p.m., at the office of Jacob Billings,

post commader. 227 First Avenue East, for consideration of important

business. Jacob Billings, Post Commander.” The Kalispell Bee.

November 27, 1901. Page 6.

1902 Jacob Billings is listed in the proceedings as a delegate of the Department

of Montana Grand Army of the Republic. Roberta Gebhardt, Library

Manager, Montana Historical Society Research Center. 225 North

Roberts. Helena, MT 59620.

1902 Jacob Billings is listed as a Past Post Commander and Delegate for the

Nat Lyons Post No. 23 Grand Army of the Republic. Journal of

Eighteenth Annual Encampment of the Department of Montana. Held

at Helena, Montana, April 24-26, 1902.

02 April 1902 “Vote for honest old Jacob Billings for Police Judge if you want money in

the treasury.” The Kalispell Bee. April 2, 1902. Page 8.

12 August 1902 “Suffrage Club Formed. As a result of the two lectures given by Miss Gail

Laughlin at Kalispell last week, a universal suffrage club has been

formed, consisting of a charter membership of 32, men and women. Of

the new organization, Dr. Rosencrans is president, Mrs. A.J. Edwards

treasurer, and Jacob Billings recording secretary.” (article continues)

Kalispell Bee. August 12, 1902. Page 5.

28 October 1902 “Mrs. Alvira Kline of Benton, Ill., is in the city on a visit to her sister,

Mrs. Jacob Billings.” The Kalispell Bee. October 28, 1902. Page 3.

17 April 1903 “While climbing to the loft in his barn last Thursday night, Judge Jacob

Billings slipped and fell, breaking his shoulder blade and sustaining other

bruises. He was confined to his bed for several days, but is now able to be

around.” Kalispell Bee. April 17, 1903. Page 8.

29 September 1903 “Jacob Billings has disposed of his farm interests on the lake and returned

to Kalispell to reside.” Kalispell Bee. September 29, 1903. Page 5.

1906 Jacob Billings is listed as a Past Post Commander for the Nat Lyons Post

No. 23 Grand Army of the Republic. Journal of Eighteenth Annual

Encampment of the Department of Montana. Held at Helena,

Montana, March 12th, 13th, and 14th, 1906.

1910 Census shows that Jacob was a resident of Kalispell, Flathead County,

Montana.

1911 “Jacob Billings moved to Hot Springs, Mont.” Polk City Directories.

Flathead and Lincoln County. Montana Memory Project.

Mtmemory.org

10 November 1911 “Next Saturday afternoon at six o’clock will be the 60th anniversary of

Grandpa Billings, and his wife. They are arranging to have a few close

friends with them on the occasion. Few people live to celebrate such an

event.” Sanders County Signal. November 10, 1911. Page 3.

19 April 1912 “Mrs. Alice Costello, of Salido, Colorado, is here visiting her father,

Grandpa Billings. She was accompanied by her grandson, a boy about

nine years old.” Sanders County Signal. April 19, 1912.

21 June 1912 “Grandpa Billings was a pleasant caller at the Signal office Tuesday. He

came in and told us that the 18 of June was a very important date in

history so far as he was concerned. It was the anniversary of the battle of

Waterloo, the Republican National Convention at Chicago and last his

birthday. Grandpa Billings was 82 last Tuesday. The Signal wishes

Grandpa many more birthdays.” Sanders County Signal, Camas, MT.

Friday, June 21, 1912.

16 July 1912 Jacob’s 1st wife, Julia Ann (Green) Billings, passed away on 16 July,

1912, in Camas Prairie, Sanders County, Montana. She is buried at the

Lone Pine Cemetery in Bigfork, Flathead County, Montana. Find a

Grave Memorial #39307721. Funeral services were held at the Camas

schoolhouse by Reverend Thomas Howland who was said to have

preached a most touching sermon. Pioneers and Early Settlers, Sanders

County Montana, Camas Area. Book One of Nine. Volume 1 of 2. By

Ann Miller.

1912 Jacob “Jake” Billings moved to the state of Washington. Pioneers and

Early Settlers, Sanders County Montana, Camas Area. Book One of

Nine. Volume 1 of 2. By Ann Miller.

07 February 1913 “Camas now has two regular justices of the peace. Judge Arnold and

Jacob Billings have received books and documents and are ready for

business.” Sanders County Signal. February 7, 1913. Page 3.

26 February 1913 “Jacob Billings has returned from an extended trip through the west.”

Daily Missoulian. February 26, 1913. Page 3.

28 February 1913 “Jacob Billings returned this week from an extended visit in California

and the state of Washington. He spent most of the winter in Los Angeles.

He did not like the climate on account of the extreme changes in the

weather. In the middle of the day it was very warm and at night quite

cold. He spent some time in Washington and liked that climate very

much. He came from Ronan with a son.” Sanders County Signal.

February 28, 1913. Page 3.

November 1914 Jacob’s daughter, Alice Catherine (Billings) Costello, passed away in

Tacoma, Pierce County, Washington.

25 December 1916 Jacob Billings (at age 86) married his 2nd wife, Ceila Ellen (Ramey)

Dorrah Billings (at age 56). They were married at the home of a son in

Chehalis, Washington. Cecil R. Blunden, minister of the 1st Christian

Church officiated. Celia was the daughter of John Ramey and Elizabeth

(Mallet) Ramey. Washington County Marriage Returns.

07 March 1921 Jacob died in Chehalis, Washington at the age of 90 years, 8 months, 19

days. He is buried at the Washington Soldiers’ Home Cemetery in Orting,

Pierce County, Washington. Find a Grave Memorial #5550568.

16 November 1927 Jacob’s son, Henry Billings, passed away in Dash Point, Pierce County,

Washington at the age of 63 years, 6 months, 4 days. He was born on

May 12, 1864. Henry’s wife was Hattie Billings. Henry Billings was

buried at Mountain View memorial Park in Lakewood, Pierce County,

Washington. Plot #R 4 38. Find a Grave Memorial # 102980861.

06 July 1931 Jacob’s son, Joseph A. Billings, passed away on July 6th, 1931 in

Montana. Joseph’s wife, Mary Jane (Inman) Billings, passed away the

following year on October 24th, 1922, in Columbia, Oregon.

16 February 1939 Jacob’s 2nd wife, Celia Ellen (Ramey) Dorrah Billings, passed away on

February 16, 1939, in Chehalis, Lewis County, Washington. Celia is

buried at Greenwood Memorial Park in Centralia, Lewis County,

Washington. She was born on 22 November, 1861, in Eagleville,

Missouri. Celia’s parents were John Preston Ramey, and Elizabeth

(Mallet) Ramey. She married Branson Dorrah in about 1880 (Missouri).

Find a Grave Memorial #48441592.

08 July 1954 Mary Charlotte “Lottie” Billings Inman passed away in Centralia, Lewis

County, Washington. “Lottie” is buried at the Napavine Cemetery in

Napavine, Lewis county, Washington. Find a Grave Memorial #1240333.

PATRIARCH.

During the last few years of the life of Demersville the town harbored a picturesque old fellow who

was a shoemaker by trade. Although he was eighty-ish in age, the old gentleman still put in hours on

the bench working at his trade of keeping the Demersville dogs in dry shoes. His name was Jacob

Billings, and his look was that of a patriarch of Biblical days. He had a heavy shock of snow-white

hair, and a long full beard equally silvery.

His life history, as gathered from his stories of early experiences, was full of colored and sometimes

hazardous incidents. He was one of those who took part in the stirring scenes of the settlement of

Kansas before the Civil War, when it was touch-and-go whether that newly-established commonwealth

was to be slave or free. His lot in that historical adventure was cast with the free-soilers, and he could

relate many of the scenes enacted when the slavery adherents made armed raids upon their adversaries,

sometimes committing outright murders of abolitionists. Though personally he had never met with

injury in those struggles, he had had several quite narrow escapes with his life.

When the war broke out the young man joined up with the Federal army, and during the struggle he and

his companions were engaged in keeping order in the Kansas and Missouri territory.

After the war ended, Billings settled in Nebraska where he was elevated to the position of justice of the

peace of his township, a job that he held for many years. The name of judge clung to him for the rest of

his life. He was quite elderly when he came to Montana, and after settlement got underway he came to

the Flathead to make his final home.

As a recounter of events of the raw West in the fifties and sixties, the old gentleman always had, and

could hold an audience of interested listeners. He was quite a popular character in the western town,

and was highly esteemed by all who came into contact with him.

Two grandsons, 12 and 13 years old, were the town’s newsboys, selling the local papers, and others that

came to the town. Their connection with their dignified and kindly grandfather made them very popular

as news vendors, so that they had a large patronage, and as a dime was the regular price for any

newspaper – nickles being scorned – they did a very profitable business.

Cemetery

Buried at Washington Old Soldiers Home Cemetery Orting

Adopt-a-Vet Sponsor

Requester: Ann Marie & Andy Liakos
Murphy, NC


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