Civil War Veterans Buried In Washington State - Jonathan Kinnear

Jonathan Ritchey Kinnear

Representing: Union


Unit History

See full unit history

Jonathan Kinnear
Full Unit History
Regimental History
Soldier History
Family History

Sergeant JOHN RITCHEY KINNEAR, Co. A, 86th Illinois

John Ritchey Kinnear was born on July 26, 1842 in West Point, Tippecanoe County, Indiana, the son of Charles Kinnear and Ellenor A. (Ritchey) Kinnear. Charles Kinnear was born c. December 30, 1808 in Pickaway Township of Ross County, Ohio. Charles was married on March 31, 1831 in Ross County, Ohio to Ellenor "Ellen" Ritchey, who was born c. 1809/10 the daughter of George Ritchey. Five children are known to have been born to Charles and Ellenor. They include;
1. Eliza (or Elizabeth) Kinnear, born on ___________ __, 1833 near Kingston, Ross County, Ohio; Eliza was married to Calvin Glazebrook Davidson, who was born in 1826, the son of Caleb Davidson and Martha Elizabeth (Glazebrook) Davidson; Eliza and Calvin are found in Olio Township in Woodford County, Illinois at the time of the 1860 census;
Calvin G Davidson M 34 Ky
Eliza Davidson F 25 Ohio
Welden O Davidson M 4 Ill
Calvin E Davidson M 2 Ill

At the time of the 1880 census, they are found in Eureka, Woodford, Illinois;
Self Calv G Davidson M 53 Kentucky
Wife Eliza Davidson F 46 Ohio
Daughter Caddie A Davidson F 11 Illinois
Daughter Annie M Davidson F 8 Illinois
Daughter Capitola Davidson F 20 Illinois

Eliza (Kinnear) Davidson died on February 26, 1913, while Calvin Glazebrook Davidson died on Nov. 12, 1915 and their mortal remains were laid in the Oak Hill Cemetery in Watseka, Iroquois County, Illinois; See their Find A Grave sites for more information about them and their family.

2. George Kinnear, born January 30, 1836 near Kingston, Ross County, Ohio; George died on July 22, 1912 in Seattle, King County, Washington and his mortal remains were laid in Lake View Cemetery in Seattle; See his Find A Grave site for more information about him and his family.

3. Rachel Ellen Kinnear, born c. 1840 in Tippecanoe County, Indiana.

4. John Ritchey Kinnear; born July 26, 1842 in Tippecanoe County, Indiana; See his biography below.

5. Lockwood A. Kinnear, born c. 1846/47, most likely in Ross County, Ohio; died on July 20, 1910 in Seattle, Washington and his mortal remains were laid in the Lake View Cemetery in Seattle, King County; See his Find A Grave site for more information about him and his family.

The Kinnear family is known to have resided near Kingston, Ohio, most likely on the Ross County, Ohio side of the Ross County/Pickaway County line. About 1839, the family is believed to have moved briefly to Tippecanoe County, Indiana, where they are said to have lived initially in a log cabin at Lafayette, Indiana on the banks of the Wabash and then on Flint Creek. Making his own bricks, Charles is said to have erected a brick dwelling with a walnut interior. By 1845/46, if not sooner, the Kinnear family, however, returned to Ross County, Ohio, where they are found at the time of the 1850 census;
At the time of the 1850 census, as stated above, the Kinnear family is found in Ross County, Ohio;
Charles Kinnear M 40 Ohio, United States
Ellen Kinnear F 40 Ohio, United States
Eliza Kinnear F 16 Ohio, United States
George Kinnear M 14 Ohio, United States
Rachel Kinnear F 10 Ohio, United States
John Kinnear M 8 Ohio, United States
Lockwood Kinnear M 4 Ohio, United States
Mary Bell F 22 Ohio, United States

In the 1850's, the Kinnears came west to Illinois where at the time of the 1860 census, the Kinnear family is found in Olio Township in Woodford County, Illinois;
Charles Kinnear M 51 Ohio
Eleanor A Kinnear F 51 Ohio
George Kinnear M 22 Ohio
Rachael Kinnear F 19 Ind
John Kinnear M 17 Ohio
Lockwood Kinnear M 14 Ohio

At the time of the 1870 census, the Kinnear family is found in Woodford County, Illinois;
Charles Kinnear M 62 Ohio
Ellen Kinnear F 61 Ohio
Lambert Kinnear M 22 Illinois
Josephene Ward F 16 Illinois
William Bradley M 22 Ohio

Ellenor A. (Ritchey) Kinnear died on Dec. 27, 1884, while Charles Kinnear died on December __, 1892 in Woodford County, Illinois. Their mortal remains were laid in the Mount Zion Cemetery near Eureka, Woodford County, Illinois.

Now to continue with the biography of John Ritchey Kinnear;
On August 7, 1862, John R. Kinnear volunteered at Eureka, Illinois to serve in a company which was being raised in the Eureka and El Paso area of Woodford County by William S. Magarity, who had been the first man elected to serve as Woodford County Sheriff in the 1840's, for service in the Union Army during the Civil War.

ILLINOIS STATE ARCHIVES
Illinois Civil War Detail Report

Name KINNEAR, JOHN R Rank CPL
Company A Unit 86 IL US INF

Personal Characteristics
Residence OLIO, WOODFORD CO, IL
Age 20 Height 5' 10 1/2 Hair LIGHT
Eyes BLUE Complexion LIGHT
Marital Status SINGLE
Occupation STUDENT Nativity IN

Service Record
Joined When AUG 7, 1862
Joined Where OLIO, IL
Joined By Whom CPT MAGARITY
Period 3 YRS Muster In AUG 27, 1862
Muster In Where PEORIA, IL
Muster In By Whom
Muster Out JUN 6, 1865
Muster Out Where WASHINGTON, DC
Muster Out By Whom LT SCROGGS
Remarks MUSTERED OUT AS SERGEANT

When Magarity had about 100 volunteers, he took his company across the Illinois River to Peoria, Illinois where they went into camp at Camp Lyon, near present day Glen Oak Park. On August 27, 1862, 96 men of the Woodford County company were mustered into service as Co. A of the 86th Regiment of Illinois Volunteer Infantry. Magarity was elected Captain of Co. A. John R. Kinnear was elected by the men to serve as their 2nd Corporal.
On September 7, 1862, the men of the 86th Illinois marched out of Camp Lyon through the streets of Peoria to the railroad station. There they were joined by the men of the 85th Illinois, who had been mustered into service at Camp Peoria. At the depot, the men of the two regiments boarded trains bound for Camp Joe Holt, in Jeffersonville, Indiana, which was located on the Ohio River across from Louisville. After several weeks of drilling, the men of the 85th & 86th were assigned to a Brigade being commanded by General Daniel McCook and they were sent into Kentucky to chase down the last Confederate troops in Kentucky.
On Oct. 8, 1862, the men of McCooks Brigade participated in the Battle of Perryville, Kentucky, a Union victory, which helped to drive the last Confederate troops out of Kentucky. The men of McCook's Brigade then marched on to Nashville, Tennessee where they began a long period of garrison duty.
During the next two and a half years, Corporal John R. Kinnear served faithfully in Co. A as the men of McCook's Brigade served in Tennessee, Alabama, Georgia, South and North Carolina. During this time, Corporal Kinnear was also a witness to and a participant in some of the bloodiest fighting of the Western Theatre of the war, including the Battles of Chickamauga, Georgia; Resaca, Georgia; Rome, Georgia; Kennesaw Mountain, Georgia, Jonesboro, Georgia; Averysboro. North Carolina and Bentonville, North Carolina and also Marched with Sherman to the Sea.
Sometime between January of 1863 and November of 1864, Corporal John R. Kinnear was elected to fill a vacancy in the Sergeant positions by the men of Co. A as a sign of his military bearing and his dedication to the service and to the men of his company. After the war came to an end and after the surrender of the army of Confederate General Johnston to the army of Union General William Tecumseh Sherman, the men of McCook's Brigade marched on to Washington D.C., where in May of 1865, they marched down Pennsylvania Avenue on the 2nd day of the Grand Review. On June 6, 1865, Sergeant John R. Kinnear was still there among the last 35 members out of the original 96 who had been mustered into service back on August 27, 1865. On June 6, 1865, the original members of the 86th who were still there with the regiment were mustered out of the service there in Washington and soon they found themselves on a train bound for Chicago, where they received their final pay and were discharged. By the end of June of 1865, the surviving members of the 86th Illinois were back with the families in Central Illinois.
Perhaps even during his last days in the service, Sergeant John Ritchey Kinnear was thinking about a history of the 86th Illinois and in 1866, the Tribune Company's Book and Job Printing Office of Chicago, Illinois, published one of the very first regimental histories from the Civil War, that of the 86th Illinois, which was entitled "HISTORY OF THE EIGHTY-SIXTH REGIMENT, ILLINOIS VOLUNTEER INFANTRY" by J. R. Kinnear, of Cruger, Woodford County, Illinois. The author, Sergeant Kinnear, wrote the following in the Preface;
"The history of the Eighty-sixth Illinois was written in part while the regiment was yet in the service, merely for the gratification of a personal desire; but since its muster out, the author has been frequently urged by many of his friends to have it published, that they might share what he alone enjoyed. He complied with an earnest request from Colonel Fahnestock to meet himself, General Magee, Major Thomas, Dr. Guth, Captain Zinser and others at Peoria, to have the manuscript examined before publication. It was met by their hearty approval, and an eager desire on their part to have it published; at the same time giving the assurance that they would lend their whole influence in getting it before the public. For these reasons the author has been induced to present this little volume to his comrades and friends, in the hope that it will receive their hearty welcome.
The history of the Eighty-sixth is also the history of the 85th, 125th and 110th Illinois, together with the 52nd Ohio and 22nd Indiana, all of the same brigade. Particular mention has been made of these regiments, for they were to the Eighty-sixth a band of faithful brothers.
The author acknowledges himself indebted, to Colonel Fahnestock, Major Thomas, Captain Major, and Acting Adjutant Loveland, for the kind assist­ance and encouragement they have given him in preparing this history for publication, and to them he attributes the merit of this work, if it possesses merit."
On June 2, 1868, John R. Kinnear was married to Rebecca (spelled Rebecka) Means in McLean County, Illinois. Rebecca was born on March 14, 1844, the daughter of Joseph Means (1804 - 1860) and Sarah (O'Neill) Means (1804 - 1884). Joseph and Sarah's mortal remains were laid in the Evergreen Memorial Cemetery in Bloomington, McLean County, Illinois.
At the time of the 1860 census, Rebecca and her family are found in Washington, Tazewell County, Illinois. Her father, Joseph, had died in March of 1860;
Sarah Means F 54 Ky
Joseph Means M 22 Ky
Mary Meck F 21 Ky
Elizabeth Means F 20 Ky
Rebecca Means F 16 Ky
Henry Means M 12 Ky

Shortly after the war ended, John R. Kinnear began the study of law. He may have attended Knox College in Knox County, Illinois for a short time and is listed as a 1865 alum, non graduate. John is known to have been educated at the Chicago Law College and practiced law in Paxton, Illinois before moving to Seattle. Two children are known to have been born to John R. and Rebecca (Means) Kinnear. They are;
1. Ritchey M. Kinnear, born __________ __, 1870 in Illinois, most likely in Paxton, Ford County, Illinois; Ritchey was married to Brownie Brown (1871 - 1957) on ___________ __, 18__; Ritchey died on __________ __, 1943 at __________, __________ and his mortal remains were laid in the Lake View Cemetery in Seattle, King County, Washington; See his Find A Grave site for more information about him and his family.

2. Leta Kinnear, born __________ __, 1878 in Illinois; Leta never married; Leta died on March __, 1953 in Seattle, Washington at the age of 75 and her mortal remains were laid in the Lake View Cemetery in Seattle, King County, Washington; See her Find A Grave site.

At the time of the 1870 census, John Ritchey Kinnear and his family are found in __________ County, Illinois;
John R Kinnear M 26 Indiana
Rebecca Kinnear F 24 Kentucky
Richie Kinnear M 0 Illinois

At the time of the 1880 census, John and his family are found in Paxton, Ford County, Illinois, where he is practicing Attorney-at-law;
Self John R Kinnear M 36 Indiana
Wife Rebecca Kinnear F 36 Kentucky
Son Ritchey Kinnear M 10 Illinois
Daughter Leta Kinnear F 2 Illinois
Other Anna M Peterson F 18 Sweden

John R. Kinnear visited his brother, George, in Seattle in 1881 and found the temperate climate to be suitable for his disposition since he had had trouble with extreme summer heat since suffering from heatstroke during the war. He then moved with his family, wife Rebecca and children Ritchey M. and Leata, to Seattle permanently in 1883.
John R. Kinnear was active in the development and growth of the Seattle area and also made a name for himself in the political realm as well. John was elected to the territorial legislature in 1884 and was re-elected at the end of his term. In 1888, he was chosen to sit on the territorial senate. He was elected to the Washington Constitutional Convention from the 20th district. His legal training won him prominence on judiciary committees, both in the legislature and in the constitutional convention. John was also the chairman of the constitutional convention committee on corporations and directed the work of framing those sections of the constitution that dealt with corporate power. He narrowly missed receiving the Republican nomination for governor at the first Republican state convention after statehood. After Washington became a state, John R. Kinnear was elected to the state senate where he served 8 years. His son, Ritchey, would later represent the same district as his father. The elder Kinnear retired from the state senate in 1895.
Sergeant John Ritchey Kinnear suffered a stroke in 1905 and a more severe attack in December of 1910. At the time of the 1910 census, John and his family are found living what is then called the 3rd Ward of the City of Seattle, King County, Washington;
Head John R Kinnear M 68 Indiana
Wife Rebecca Kinnear F 66 Kentucky
Daughter Leta Kinnear F 32 Illinois
Gardener Julian Boules M 59 France
Servant Rimpie Suyetake M 22 Japan

After the attack of 1910, John R. Kinnear's health continued to fail until his death on March 31, 1912, in Seattle, King County, Washington. Rebecca (Means) Kinnear died a year later on ____________ __, 1913 and their mortal remains were laid in the Lake View Cemetery in Seattle, King County, Washington.

Obit/Notes from the Monday, April 1, 1912 edition of the Seattle Post-Intelligencer, page 2, column E;
"JOHN R. KINNEAR, LONG ILL, DEAD
Early Resident Succumbs Before Family Can Be Summoned
LEFT MARK ON STATE
Civil War Veteran Helped Frame Constitution, Made Laws and Led in Politics

John R. Kinnear, civil war veteran, lawyer, a member of both territorial and state legislatures and of the constitutional convention, died at 4:15 o'clock yesterday morning of paralysis. He had suffered a stroke seven years ago and a second and more severe attack in December, 1910. When the nurse, who has been in attendance on him for more than a year, noticed early yesterday morning that he was sinking, he went so rapidly that there was not enough time to summon all the members of the family before death occurred.
A widow, Mrs. Means Kinnear, who the former state senator married in Bloomington, Ill., forty-four years ago; a son, Richey[sic] M. Kinnear, of the firm of Kennear[sic] & Paul; a daughter, Miss Leata Kinnear, a brother, George Kinnear, of Seattle, and a sister, Mrs. Eliza Davidson, are the immediate surviving relatives. The funeral will be held tomorrow at 2 p.m. from the family residence, 338 Olympia place. Stevens Post, G. A. R., of which Mr. Kinnear was a former commander, will have charge of the services.
Though incapacitated for business by his last paralytic stroke, Mr. Kinnear was strong enough to be taken from his home and had planned, late Saturday night, to make a visit to the home of Frank Paul yesterday with his son, former State Senator R. M. Kinnear.
From the time J. R. Kinnear came to Washington in 1883 until he retired from the state senate in 1895, he was a prominent figure in Washington politics, narrowly missing the Republican nomination for governor at the first Republican state convention after statehood. His friends had carried King county, but the delegation from Seattle did not reach Walla Walla, the convention city, until 2 o'clock on the morning of the convention and in the meantime friends of Elisha P. Ferry, a former territorial governor, had captured a majority of the convention delegates.
Mr. Kinnear was elected to the territorial legislature a year after he settled in this state, re-elected at the end of that term and was chosen in 1888 to sit in the territorial senate. The granting of statehood prevented the meeting of the legislature, but when Washington was admitted he was elected immediately to the upper branch of the legislature, serving eight years in the senate. Subsequently his son, R. M. Kinnear, was elected to the state senate from the same district his father had represented.
Though an active and well-known attorney in Illinois, Mr. Kinnear was not active in his profession after he came to Washington, though both as a member of the legislature and in the constitutional convention his legal training won him prominence on the judiciary committees. He was chairman of the constitutional convention committee on corporations and directed the work of framing those sections which deal with corporate powers.
During the civil war Mr. Kinnear suffered from sunstroke, and indirectly that accident was responsible for his coming to Seattle. He had been compelled while in living in Illinois to leave for a Northern country during the summers to escape the intense heat of the Middle West, and in 1881 visited his brother, George Kinnear, in Seattle. His decision to move to Seattle, where extremes of heat and cold were both unknown, was formed immediately.
Mr. Kinnear was born in West Point, Ind., July 26, 1842, moving seven years later to Woodford county. His early education was in the public and private schools of Indiana, and he was completing a four-year academic course in Knox college, Galesburg, Ill., when he responded to a call for troops during the civil war. He enlisted in the Eighty-sixth Indiana volunteer infantry, serving three years and participating in Sherman's famous march to the sea. After the close of the war Mr. Kinnear studied law in the Chicago law college and practiced in Paxton, Ill., until he came to Seattle.
During the time he was in law school Mr. Kinnear wrote a history of the civil war record of his regiment and brigade, a work that has been accepted as one of the best regimental histories published for Indiana troops."

-- Funeral notice, Seattle Post-Intelligencer, Monday, April 1, 1912, page 8, column D;
"KINNEAR - At the family residence, 338 Olympia place, March 31, 1912, John R. Kinnear, aged 69 years, member Stevens Post, G. A. R.
Funeral services will be held at the family residence, Tuesday afternoon at 2 o'clock, under the auspices of Stevens Post, G. A. R., after which interment will be made in the family plot in Lake View cemetery."

by Baxter B. Fite III and The Seakers, FAG Contributor #50146847, whose email address is theseakers4u@gmail.com

(Baxter would enjoy hearing from anyone, especially descendants of the Kinnear family, who might be able to add to the biographical material that we have on Sergeant John Ritchey Kinnear and the Kinnear family. Baxter would also like to see copies of other photographs of John R. Kinnear, especially any showing him in uniform from his days in the service, added to his Find A Grave site for all to see.)

********************************************************************************************************************************************

Highest Rank
Sergeant
Unit
Co. A, 86th Illinois Infantry
Date
between 1890 and 1912
Born
July 26, 1842
Place Born
West Point, IN
Died
March 31, 1912
Place Died
Seattle, WA
Buried
Lake View (Seattle)
Service Record
Residence Olio, IL; enlisted on 8/7/1862 as a Corporal and mustered into "A" Co. IL 86th Infantry; promoted to Sergeant; Mustered Out on 6/6/1865 at Washington, DC
Obit/Notes
-- Seattle Post-Intelligencer, Monday, April 1, 1912, page 2, column E

JOHN R. KINNEAR, LONG ILL, DEAD
Early Resident Succumbs Before Family Can Be Summoned
LEFT MARK ON STATE
Civil War Veteran Helped Frame Constitution, Made Laws and Led in Politics

John R. Kinnear, civil war veteran, lawyer, a member of both territorial and state legislatures and of the constitutional convention, died at 4:15 o'clock yesterday morning of paralysis. He had suffered a stroke seven years ago and a second and more severe attack in December, 1910. When the nurse, who has been in attendance on him for more than a year, noticed early yesterday morning that he was sinking, he went so rapidly that there was not enough time to summon all the members of the family before death occurred.

A widow, Mrs. Means Kinnear, who the former state senator married in Bloomington, Ill., forty-four years ago; a son, Richey[sic] M. Kinnear, of the firm of Kennear[sic] & Paul; a daughter, Miss Leata Kinnear, a brother, George Kinnear, of Seattle, and a sister, Mrs. Eliza Davidson, are the immediate surviving relatives. The funeral will be held tomorrow at 2 p.m. from the family residence, 338 Olympia place. Stevens Post, G. A. R., of which Mr. Kinnear was a former commander, will have charge of the services.

Though incapacitated for business by his last paralytic stroke, Mr. Kinnear was strong enough to be taken from his home and had planned, late Saturday night, to make a visit to the home of Frank Paul yesterday with his son, former State Senator R. M. Kinnear.

From the time J. R. Kinnear came to Washington in 1883 until he retired from the state senate in 1895, he was a prominent figure in Washington politics, narrowly missing the Republican nomination for governor at the first Republican state convention after statehood. His friends had carried King county, but the delegation from Seattle did not reach Walla Walla, the convention city, until 2 o'clock on the morning of the convention and in the meantime friends of Elisha P. Ferry, a former territorial governor, had captured a majority of the convention delegates.

Mr. Kinnear was elected to the territorial legislature a year after he settled in this state, re-elected at the end of that term and was chosen in 1888 to sit in the territorial senate. The granting of statehood prevented the meeting of the legislature, but when Washington was admitted he was elected immediately to the upper branch of the legislature, serving eight years in the senate. Subsequently his son, R. M. Kinnear, was elected to the state senate from the same district his father had represented.

Though an active and well-known attorney in Illinois, Mr. Kinnear was not active in his profession after he came to Washington, though both as a member of the legislature and in the constitutional convention his legal training won him prominence on the judiciary committees. He was chairman of the constitutional convention committee on corporations and directed the work of framing those sections which deal with corporate powers.

During the civil war Mr. Kinnear suffered from sunstroke, and indirectly that accident was responsible for his coming to Seattle. He had been compelled while in living in Illinois to leave for a Northern country during the summers to escape the intense heat of the Middle West, and in 1881 visited his brother, George Kinnear, in Seattle. His decision to move to Seattle, where extremes of heat and cold were both unknown, was formed immediately.

Mr. Kinnear was born in West Point, Ind., July 26, 1842, moving seven years later to Woodford county. His early education was in the public and private schools of Indiana, and he was completing a four-year academic course in Knox college, Galesburg, Ill., when he responded to a call for troops during the civil war. He enlisted in the Eighty-sixth Indiana volunteer infantry, serving three years and participating in Sherman's famous march to the sea. After the close of the war Mr. Kinnear studied law in the Chicago law college and practiced in Paxton, Ill., until he came to Seattle.

During the time he was in law school Mr. Kinnear wrote a history of the civil war record of his regiment and brigade, a work that has been accepted as one of the best regimental histories published for Indiana troops.

-- Funeral notice, Seattle Post-Intelligencer, Monday, April 1, 1912, page 8, column D

KINNEAR - At the family residence, 338 Olympia place, March 31, 1912, John R. Kinnear, aged 69 years, member Stevens Post, G. A. R.

Funeral services will be held at the family residence, Tuesday afternoon at 2 o'clock, under the auspices of Stevens Post, G. A. R., after which interment will be made in the family plot in Lake View cemetery.
Source: https://digitalcollections.lib.washington.edu/digital/collection/gar/id/84/rec/72
 

 

Cemetery

Buried at Lake View Cemetery

Adopt-a-Vet Sponsor


©2020 Civil War Veterans Buried In Washington State • All Rights Reserved.